Dirty Bourbon River Show


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About

The Dirty Bourbon River Show deftly melds sounds that range from hard-edged blues to Lisztian piano driven ballads to New Orleans brass into a result that is truly a blast of new energy into the musical landscape. Dirty Bourbon grabs hold of audiences, fascinated by their eccentricity and dexterity coupled ...

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Contact

Publicist
Ryan Dawes

Current News

  • 06/19/201507/31/2015
  • New Orleans, LA

The Shock of the Old, the Wild Call of the New: New Orleans’ Dirty Bourbon River Show Spreads the Word About Important Things Humans Should Know on National Tour, April-July 2015

Step right up. Dirty Bourbon River Show winks at the old-time medicine show, with music to draw in crowds. But there’s no snake oil on offer, just sounds enough to fascinate, enthrall, and heal. Tubas tango with feral-voiced crooners, punkish numbers bump into the sweet plunking of a ballad.

These wonderful madmen play the gospel of New Orleans song, and they preach it loudly on their ninth album, Important Things Humans Should Know (release: April 7, 2015), then taking the word on the...

Press

  • Second Story Garage, Feature story, 08/10/2015, Dirty Bourbon River Show chat with Quentin Young Text
  • The Phoenix New Times, Concert listing, 06/30/2015, Dirty Bourbon River Show in Phoenix Text
  • The Portland Mercury, Concert listing, 06/30/2015, Dirty Bourbon River Show in Portland Text
  • mxdwn.com, 06/25/2015, Dirty Bourbon River Show release new video for "Animal" Text
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News

07/31/2015, New Orleans, LA, The Maple Leaf, 10:30 PM
06/19/201507/31/2015, The Shock of the Old, the Wild Call of the New: New Orleans’ Dirty Bourbon River Show Spreads the Word About Important Things Humans Should Know on National Tour, April-July 2015
Event
07/31/2015
Event
07/31/2015
Concert Start Time
10:30 PM
Venue
The Maple Leaf
Venue St. Address
8316 Oak Street
Venue City, State
New Orleans, LA
Venue Zip
70118
Ticket Phone
(504) 866-9359
Step right up. Dirty Bourbon River Show winks at the old-time medicine show, with music to draw in crowds. But there’s no snake oil on offer, just sounds enough to fascinate, enthrall, and heal. Tubas tango with feral-voiced crooners, punkish numbers bump into the sweet plunking of a ballad. MORE» More»

Step right up. Dirty Bourbon River Show winks at the old-time medicine show, with music to draw in crowds. But there’s no snake oil on offer, just sounds enough to fascinate, enthrall, and heal. Tubas tango with feral-voiced crooners, punkish numbers bump into the sweet plunking of a ballad.

These wonderful madmen play the gospel of New Orleans song, and they preach it loudly on their ninth album, Important Things Humans Should Know (release: April 7, 2015), then taking the word on the road with a four-month U.S. tour.

Band leader and multi-instrumentalist Noah Adams came late to music; he was 20 when he began playing the piano. But it was drifting into the Crescent City that really changed his life. Finding himself in a place where music drips from the pores likes summer sweat, he knew he’d discovered his calling, and began proselytizing like a convert. “I got swept away by amazing players like Dr. John, Fats Waller, Huey Smith,” Adams recalls. “I spent three years just shedding and absorbing stuff.” And from that start the Dirty Bourbon River Show was born in 2009.

“Our very first gig was at Tipitina’s Homegrown Night, where you can get your start,” Adams says. “It’s free, you just try to get people to say your name at the door. We told everyone. It was an hour slot, but we only had 30 minutes of music. We got an amazing turn out, went all out, and it just grew from there.”

A mix of New Orleans natives and people drawn from farther afield, the show mixes its influences like a roux. Jimmy William’s tuba and Dane "Bootsy" Schindler’s drums on “Animal” make Caribbean vibes collide with a booming brass dirge. “Wicked,” a paean to the Big Easy’s seamy side, tips its hat to songwriters like Dr. John and Randy Newman. The album is a love song to the city on the Gulf Coast.

It took time to build Dirty Bourbon River Show. Finding the right combination of musicians and learning how they worked best together, then assimilating influences from the city’s newest immigrants, the razor-sharp Balkan horn sound. “We’re always tinkering and playing with parts,” Adams explains. “And we’ve released a lot of albums, churned them out. It was a good way of figuring out who we were, how to incorporate a lot of things into one song. Important Thing Humans Should Know is the first time we’ve worked with an outside producer, Craig Schumacher, who’s worked with Neko Case, Calexico, and Devotchka.”

Along with the music, the band developed their performances. A gig had to be more than simply arriving on stage and playing. It had to be an event. A circus.“We definitely think a lot about that,” Adams agrees. “It’s like Shostakovich meets Entry of the Gladiators. There’s a ringmaster, and very physical performances. There are kind of vignettes you used to find in vaudeville. We change tempo, key, styles, so it unfolds like a story. And we include a lot of jazz. We want to be people’s gateway to jazz! It’s just not listened to enough anymore, and New Orleans is where it was born.”

The showmanship has always gone beyond the stage. On their first tour, which took them up to North Carolina, they made sure they’d be heard by giving away copies of their aptly-named Free Love CD. “We played a midday slot at one show,” Adams laughs. “We had a healthy stack of CDs, and we were swarmed. They took every one of them.”

It was a stunt, but it worked, another step along the road. The next was a six-month residency in a burlesque bar, followed by more touring, recording, and playing. They’ve paid their dues.

To celebrate the release of Important Things Human Should Know, the band will be heading out again, for a four-month trek across the United States. Music from the new album will form the centerpiece of each performance, of course, from the jazz-punk of “One-Legged One-Armed One-Eyed Unicycle Man,” a full-throttle brass assault on the senses that features horn man Matt Thomas playing two saxes at once, to the organ-driven cumbia-inflected dance powerhouse of “The Clams And I” or the short story that’s the tale of “Like The Movies.”

Switching instruments mid-song, on-stage fireballs, sudden group chants and stomps to catch the audience, they put on a show in a way that’s become a lost art these days. It’s not the shock of the new but the shock of the old, brought back and presented in a new context.

Dirty Bourbon River Show doesn’t restrict its playing to the stage. In downtime at home they’re just as likely to get out and play on the street. Simply for the pleasure of it and to keep up their chops. Like the best New Orleans artists, music is in their blood. They can’t get enough of it.

“We’re really fortunate in our location and who we are,” Adams says. “It’s a wonderful accident.”

Event
07/31/2015

07/24/2015, Floyd, VA, Floyd Fest
06/01/201507/24/2015, The Shock of the Old, the Wild Call of the New: New Orleans’ Dirty Bourbon River Show Spreads the Word About Important Things Humans Should Know on National Tour, April-July 2015
Event
07/24/2015
Event
07/24/2015
Venue
Floyd Fest
Venue St. Address
MM 170.50 Blue Ridge Parkway
Venue City, State
Floyd, VA
Ticket Phone
888-VA-FESTS
Ticket URL
http://floydfest.com/tickets/
Event Notes
also performing 7/25/15
Step right up. Dirty Bourbon River Show winks at the old-time medicine show, with music to draw in crowds. But there’s no snake oil on offer, just sounds enough to fascinate, enthrall, and heal. Tubas tango with feral-voiced crooners, punkish numbers bump into the sweet plunking of a ballad. MORE» More»

Step right up. Dirty Bourbon River Show winks at the old-time medicine show, with music to draw in crowds. But there’s no snake oil on offer, just sounds enough to fascinate, enthrall, and heal. Tubas tango with feral-voiced crooners, punkish numbers bump into the sweet plunking of a ballad.

These wonderful madmen play the gospel of New Orleans song, and they preach it loudly on their ninth album, Important Things Humans Should Know (release: April 7, 2015), then taking the word on the road with a four-month U.S. tour.

Band leader and multi-instrumentalist Noah Adams came late to music; he was 20 when he began playing the piano. But it was drifting into the Crescent City that really changed his life. Finding himself in a place where music drips from the pores likes summer sweat, he knew he’d discovered his calling, and began proselytizing like a convert. “I got swept away by amazing players like Dr. John, Fats Waller, Huey Smith,” Adams recalls. “I spent three years just shedding and absorbing stuff.” And from that start the Dirty Bourbon River Show was born in 2009.

“Our very first gig was at Tipitina’s Homegrown Night, where you can get your start,” Adams says. “It’s free, you just try to get people to say your name at the door. We told everyone. It was an hour slot, but we only had 30 minutes of music. We got an amazing turn out, went all out, and it just grew from there.”

A mix of New Orleans natives and people drawn from farther afield, the show mixes its influences like a roux. Jimmy William’s tuba and Dane "Bootsy" Schindler’s drums on “Animal” make Caribbean vibes collide with a booming brass dirge. “Wicked,” a paean to the Big Easy’s seamy side, tips its hat to songwriters like Dr. John and Randy Newman. The album is a love song to the city on the Gulf Coast.

It took time to build Dirty Bourbon River Show. Finding the right combination of musicians and learning how they worked best together, then assimilating influences from the city’s newest immigrants, the razor-sharp Balkan horn sound. “We’re always tinkering and playing with parts,” Adams explains. “And we’ve released a lot of albums, churned them out. It was a good way of figuring out who we were, how to incorporate a lot of things into one song. Important Thing Humans Should Know is the first time we’ve worked with an outside producer, Craig Schumacher, who’s worked with Neko Case, Calexico, and Devotchka.”

Along with the music, the band developed their performances. A gig had to be more than simply arriving on stage and playing. It had to be an event. A circus.“We definitely think a lot about that,” Adams agrees. “It’s like Shostakovich meets Entry of the Gladiators. There’s a ringmaster, and very physical performances. There are kind of vignettes you used to find in vaudeville. We change tempo, key, styles, so it unfolds like a story. And we include a lot of jazz. We want to be people’s gateway to jazz! It’s just not listened to enough anymore, and New Orleans is where it was born.”

The showmanship has always gone beyond the stage. On their first tour, which took them up to North Carolina, they made sure they’d be heard by giving away copies of their aptly-named Free Love CD. “We played a midday slot at one show,” Adams laughs. “We had a healthy stack of CDs, and we were swarmed. They took every one of them.”

It was a stunt, but it worked, another step along the road. The next was a six-month residency in a burlesque bar, followed by more touring, recording, and playing. They’ve paid their dues.

To celebrate the release of Important Things Human Should Know, the band will be heading out again, for a four-month trek across the United States. Music from the new album will form the centerpiece of each performance, of course, from the jazz-punk of “One-Legged One-Armed One-Eyed Unicycle Man,” a full-throttle brass assault on the senses that features horn man Matt Thomas playing two saxes at once, to the organ-driven cumbia-inflected dance powerhouse of “The Clams And I” or the short story that’s the tale of “Like The Movies.”

Switching instruments mid-song, on-stage fireballs, sudden group chants and stomps to catch the audience, they put on a show in a way that’s become a lost art these days. It’s not the shock of the new but the shock of the old, brought back and presented in a new context.

Dirty Bourbon River Show doesn’t restrict its playing to the stage. In downtime at home they’re just as likely to get out and play on the street. Simply for the pleasure of it and to keep up their chops. Like the best New Orleans artists, music is in their blood. They can’t get enough of it.

“We’re really fortunate in our location and who we are,” Adams says. “It’s a wonderful accident.”

Event
07/24/2015

07/23/2015, Winchester, VA, Bright Box Theater, 8:00 PM
06/17/201507/23/2015, The Shock of the Old, the Wild Call of the New: New Orleans’ Dirty Bourbon River Show Spreads the Word About Important Things Humans Should Know on National Tour, April-July 2015
Event
07/23/2015
Event
07/23/2015
Concert Start Time
8:00 PM
Venue
Bright Box Theater
Venue St. Address
15 N. Loudoun Street
Venue City, State
Winchester, VA
Venue Zip
22601
Ticket Phone
(540) 665-2878
Ticket URL
http://www.brightboxwinchester.com/events/
Step right up. Dirty Bourbon River Show winks at the old-time medicine show, with music to draw in crowds. But there’s no snake oil on offer, just sounds enough to fascinate, enthrall, and heal. Tubas tango with feral-voiced crooners, punkish numbers bump into the sweet plunking of a ballad. MORE» More»

Step right up. Dirty Bourbon River Show winks at the old-time medicine show, with music to draw in crowds. But there’s no snake oil on offer, just sounds enough to fascinate, enthrall, and heal. Tubas tango with feral-voiced crooners, punkish numbers bump into the sweet plunking of a ballad.

These wonderful madmen play the gospel of New Orleans song, and they preach it loudly on their ninth album, Important Things Humans Should Know (release: April 7, 2015), then taking the word on the road with a four-month U.S. tour.

Band leader and multi-instrumentalist Noah Adams came late to music; he was 20 when he began playing the piano. But it was drifting into the Crescent City that really changed his life. Finding himself in a place where music drips from the pores likes summer sweat, he knew he’d discovered his calling, and began proselytizing like a convert. “I got swept away by amazing players like Dr. John, Fats Waller, Huey Smith,” Adams recalls. “I spent three years just shedding and absorbing stuff.” And from that start the Dirty Bourbon River Show was born in 2009.

“Our very first gig was at Tipitina’s Homegrown Night, where you can get your start,” Adams says. “It’s free, you just try to get people to say your name at the door. We told everyone. It was an hour slot, but we only had 30 minutes of music. We got an amazing turn out, went all out, and it just grew from there.”

A mix of New Orleans natives and people drawn from farther afield, the show mixes its influences like a roux. Jimmy William’s tuba and Dane "Bootsy" Schindler’s drums on “Animal” make Caribbean vibes collide with a booming brass dirge. “Wicked,” a paean to the Big Easy’s seamy side, tips its hat to songwriters like Dr. John and Randy Newman. The album is a love song to the city on the Gulf Coast.

It took time to build Dirty Bourbon River Show. Finding the right combination of musicians and learning how they worked best together, then assimilating influences from the city’s newest immigrants, the razor-sharp Balkan horn sound. “We’re always tinkering and playing with parts,” Adams explains. “And we’ve released a lot of albums, churned them out. It was a good way of figuring out who we were, how to incorporate a lot of things into one song. Important Thing Humans Should Know is the first time we’ve worked with an outside producer, Craig Schumacher, who’s worked with Neko Case, Calexico, and Devotchka.”

Along with the music, the band developed their performances. A gig had to be more than simply arriving on stage and playing. It had to be an event. A circus.“We definitely think a lot about that,” Adams agrees. “It’s like Shostakovich meets Entry of the Gladiators. There’s a ringmaster, and very physical performances. There are kind of vignettes you used to find in vaudeville. We change tempo, key, styles, so it unfolds like a story. And we include a lot of jazz. We want to be people’s gateway to jazz! It’s just not listened to enough anymore, and New Orleans is where it was born.”

The showmanship has always gone beyond the stage. On their first tour, which took them up to North Carolina, they made sure they’d be heard by giving away copies of their aptly-named Free Love CD. “We played a midday slot at one show,” Adams laughs. “We had a healthy stack of CDs, and we were swarmed. They took every one of them.”

It was a stunt, but it worked, another step along the road. The next was a six-month residency in a burlesque bar, followed by more touring, recording, and playing. They’ve paid their dues.

To celebrate the release of Important Things Human Should Know, the band will be heading out again, for a four-month trek across the United States. Music from the new album will form the centerpiece of each performance, of course, from the jazz-punk of “One-Legged One-Armed One-Eyed Unicycle Man,” a full-throttle brass assault on the senses that features horn man Matt Thomas playing two saxes at once, to the organ-driven cumbia-inflected dance powerhouse of “The Clams And I” or the short story that’s the tale of “Like The Movies.”

Switching instruments mid-song, on-stage fireballs, sudden group chants and stomps to catch the audience, they put on a show in a way that’s become a lost art these days. It’s not the shock of the new but the shock of the old, brought back and presented in a new context.

Dirty Bourbon River Show doesn’t restrict its playing to the stage. In downtime at home they’re just as likely to get out and play on the street. Simply for the pleasure of it and to keep up their chops. Like the best New Orleans artists, music is in their blood. They can’t get enough of it.

“We’re really fortunate in our location and who we are,” Adams says. “It’s a wonderful accident.”

Event
07/23/2015

07/22/2015, Richmond, VA, The Broadberry, 9:00 PM
06/01/201507/22/2015, The Shock of the Old, the Wild Call of the New: New Orleans’ Dirty Bourbon River Show Spreads the Word About Important Things Humans Should Know on National Tour, April-July 2015
Event
07/22/2015
Event
07/22/2015
Doors Open
8:00 PM
Concert Start Time
9:00 PM
Venue
The Broadberry
Venue St. Address
2729 W Broad St
Venue City, State
Richmond, VA
Venue Zip
23220
Ticket Price(s)
$10.00
Ticket Phone
(804) 353-1888
Step right up. Dirty Bourbon River Show winks at the old-time medicine show, with music to draw in crowds. But there’s no snake oil on offer, just sounds enough to fascinate, enthrall, and heal. Tubas tango with feral-voiced crooners, punkish numbers bump into the sweet plunking of a ballad. MORE» More»

Step right up. Dirty Bourbon River Show winks at the old-time medicine show, with music to draw in crowds. But there’s no snake oil on offer, just sounds enough to fascinate, enthrall, and heal. Tubas tango with feral-voiced crooners, punkish numbers bump into the sweet plunking of a ballad.

These wonderful madmen play the gospel of New Orleans song, and they preach it loudly on their ninth album, Important Things Humans Should Know (release: April 7, 2015), then taking the word on the road with a four-month U.S. tour.

Band leader and multi-instrumentalist Noah Adams came late to music; he was 20 when he began playing the piano. But it was drifting into the Crescent City that really changed his life. Finding himself in a place where music drips from the pores likes summer sweat, he knew he’d discovered his calling, and began proselytizing like a convert. “I got swept away by amazing players like Dr. John, Fats Waller, Huey Smith,” Adams recalls. “I spent three years just shedding and absorbing stuff.” And from that start the Dirty Bourbon River Show was born in 2009.

“Our very first gig was at Tipitina’s Homegrown Night, where you can get your start,” Adams says. “It’s free, you just try to get people to say your name at the door. We told everyone. It was an hour slot, but we only had 30 minutes of music. We got an amazing turn out, went all out, and it just grew from there.”

A mix of New Orleans natives and people drawn from farther afield, the show mixes its influences like a roux. Jimmy William’s tuba and Dane "Bootsy" Schindler’s drums on “Animal” make Caribbean vibes collide with a booming brass dirge. “Wicked,” a paean to the Big Easy’s seamy side, tips its hat to songwriters like Dr. John and Randy Newman. The album is a love song to the city on the Gulf Coast.

It took time to build Dirty Bourbon River Show. Finding the right combination of musicians and learning how they worked best together, then assimilating influences from the city’s newest immigrants, the razor-sharp Balkan horn sound. “We’re always tinkering and playing with parts,” Adams explains. “And we’ve released a lot of albums, churned them out. It was a good way of figuring out who we were, how to incorporate a lot of things into one song. Important Thing Humans Should Know is the first time we’ve worked with an outside producer, Craig Schumacher, who’s worked with Neko Case, Calexico, and Devotchka.”

Along with the music, the band developed their performances. A gig had to be more than simply arriving on stage and playing. It had to be an event. A circus.“We definitely think a lot about that,” Adams agrees. “It’s like Shostakovich meets Entry of the Gladiators. There’s a ringmaster, and very physical performances. There are kind of vignettes you used to find in vaudeville. We change tempo, key, styles, so it unfolds like a story. And we include a lot of jazz. We want to be people’s gateway to jazz! It’s just not listened to enough anymore, and New Orleans is where it was born.”

The showmanship has always gone beyond the stage. On their first tour, which took them up to North Carolina, they made sure they’d be heard by giving away copies of their aptly-named Free Love CD. “We played a midday slot at one show,” Adams laughs. “We had a healthy stack of CDs, and we were swarmed. They took every one of them.”

It was a stunt, but it worked, another step along the road. The next was a six-month residency in a burlesque bar, followed by more touring, recording, and playing. They’ve paid their dues.

To celebrate the release of Important Things Human Should Know, the band will be heading out again, for a four-month trek across the United States. Music from the new album will form the centerpiece of each performance, of course, from the jazz-punk of “One-Legged One-Armed One-Eyed Unicycle Man,” a full-throttle brass assault on the senses that features horn man Matt Thomas playing two saxes at once, to the organ-driven cumbia-inflected dance powerhouse of “The Clams And I” or the short story that’s the tale of “Like The Movies.”

Switching instruments mid-song, on-stage fireballs, sudden group chants and stomps to catch the audience, they put on a show in a way that’s become a lost art these days. It’s not the shock of the new but the shock of the old, brought back and presented in a new context.

Dirty Bourbon River Show doesn’t restrict its playing to the stage. In downtime at home they’re just as likely to get out and play on the street. Simply for the pleasure of it and to keep up their chops. Like the best New Orleans artists, music is in their blood. They can’t get enough of it.

“We’re really fortunate in our location and who we are,” Adams says. “It’s a wonderful accident.”

Event
07/22/2015

07/21/2015, Greensboro, NC, Blind Tiger, 10:00 PM
06/01/201507/21/2015, The Shock of the Old, the Wild Call of the New: New Orleans’ Dirty Bourbon River Show Spreads the Word About Important Things Humans Should Know on National Tour, April-July 2015
Event
07/21/2015
Event
07/21/2015
Doors Open
8:00 PM
Concert Start Time
10:00 PM
Venue
Blind Tiger
Venue St. Address
1819 Spring Garden St
Venue City, State
Greensboro, NC
Venue Zip
27403
Ticket Price(s)
$10.00
Ticket Phone
(336) 272-9888
Ticket URL
http://www.etix.com/ticket/online/
Step right up. Dirty Bourbon River Show winks at the old-time medicine show, with music to draw in crowds. But there’s no snake oil on offer, just sounds enough to fascinate, enthrall, and heal. Tubas tango with feral-voiced crooners, punkish numbers bump into the sweet plunking of a ballad. MORE» More»

Step right up. Dirty Bourbon River Show winks at the old-time medicine show, with music to draw in crowds. But there’s no snake oil on offer, just sounds enough to fascinate, enthrall, and heal. Tubas tango with feral-voiced crooners, punkish numbers bump into the sweet plunking of a ballad.

These wonderful madmen play the gospel of New Orleans song, and they preach it loudly on their ninth album, Important Things Humans Should Know (release: April 7, 2015), then taking the word on the road with a four-month U.S. tour.

Band leader and multi-instrumentalist Noah Adams came late to music; he was 20 when he began playing the piano. But it was drifting into the Crescent City that really changed his life. Finding himself in a place where music drips from the pores likes summer sweat, he knew he’d discovered his calling, and began proselytizing like a convert. “I got swept away by amazing players like Dr. John, Fats Waller, Huey Smith,” Adams recalls. “I spent three years just shedding and absorbing stuff.” And from that start the Dirty Bourbon River Show was born in 2009.

“Our very first gig was at Tipitina’s Homegrown Night, where you can get your start,” Adams says. “It’s free, you just try to get people to say your name at the door. We told everyone. It was an hour slot, but we only had 30 minutes of music. We got an amazing turn out, went all out, and it just grew from there.”

A mix of New Orleans natives and people drawn from farther afield, the show mixes its influences like a roux. Jimmy William’s tuba and Dane "Bootsy" Schindler’s drums on “Animal” make Caribbean vibes collide with a booming brass dirge. “Wicked,” a paean to the Big Easy’s seamy side, tips its hat to songwriters like Dr. John and Randy Newman. The album is a love song to the city on the Gulf Coast.

It took time to build Dirty Bourbon River Show. Finding the right combination of musicians and learning how they worked best together, then assimilating influences from the city’s newest immigrants, the razor-sharp Balkan horn sound. “We’re always tinkering and playing with parts,” Adams explains. “And we’ve released a lot of albums, churned them out. It was a good way of figuring out who we were, how to incorporate a lot of things into one song. Important Thing Humans Should Know is the first time we’ve worked with an outside producer, Craig Schumacher, who’s worked with Neko Case, Calexico, and Devotchka.”

Along with the music, the band developed their performances. A gig had to be more than simply arriving on stage and playing. It had to be an event. A circus.“We definitely think a lot about that,” Adams agrees. “It’s like Shostakovich meets Entry of the Gladiators. There’s a ringmaster, and very physical performances. There are kind of vignettes you used to find in vaudeville. We change tempo, key, styles, so it unfolds like a story. And we include a lot of jazz. We want to be people’s gateway to jazz! It’s just not listened to enough anymore, and New Orleans is where it was born.”

The showmanship has always gone beyond the stage. On their first tour, which took them up to North Carolina, they made sure they’d be heard by giving away copies of their aptly-named Free Love CD. “We played a midday slot at one show,” Adams laughs. “We had a healthy stack of CDs, and we were swarmed. They took every one of them.”

It was a stunt, but it worked, another step along the road. The next was a six-month residency in a burlesque bar, followed by more touring, recording, and playing. They’ve paid their dues.

To celebrate the release of Important Things Human Should Know, the band will be heading out again, for a four-month trek across the United States. Music from the new album will form the centerpiece of each performance, of course, from the jazz-punk of “One-Legged One-Armed One-Eyed Unicycle Man,” a full-throttle brass assault on the senses that features horn man Matt Thomas playing two saxes at once, to the organ-driven cumbia-inflected dance powerhouse of “The Clams And I” or the short story that’s the tale of “Like The Movies.”

Switching instruments mid-song, on-stage fireballs, sudden group chants and stomps to catch the audience, they put on a show in a way that’s become a lost art these days. It’s not the shock of the new but the shock of the old, brought back and presented in a new context.

Dirty Bourbon River Show doesn’t restrict its playing to the stage. In downtime at home they’re just as likely to get out and play on the street. Simply for the pleasure of it and to keep up their chops. Like the best New Orleans artists, music is in their blood. They can’t get enough of it.

“We’re really fortunate in our location and who we are,” Adams says. “It’s a wonderful accident.”

Event
07/21/2015